Giving Tuesday Is A Way Of Life

A number of charities and businesses across the country have named today “Giving Tuesday,” so perhaps it is fitting that today representatives of NDNU’s Mail Center delivered more than 20 boxes of warm weather clothing to InnVision/Shelter Network. However, community engagement isn’t a one-day process; at NDNU, it’s a way of life.

Even though David Baird doesn’t work in the classroom, he still found a way to incorporate the social justice mission of the university into his work and teach those values to our students. Baird, who runs the university’s Mail Center, organized a coat drive for the second consecutive year not only to help those who needed clothing to keep warm in the winter, but also to demonstrate to his student workers the importance of helping those who are in need. “I like involving the students so we can give them a taste of what community engagement is like, and show them that it doesn’t take much effort to help lots of people,” said Baird. The students who assisted Baird with the coat drive are Alex Aguilar, Sal Arias, Gerardo Rodriguez, Marisela Torres, Cristina Basulto and Jordan Tupfer Cruz. “Marisela went with me to deliver the coats,” said Baird, “and we talked about how the little that we did makes a big difference. She could appreciate that.”

From October 15 to November 21, the Mail Center collected donations of coats, rain jackets, boots, scarves, hats, sweaters and umbrellas from students, staff and faculty. Anyone wishing to make a donation simply had to notify the Mail Center and someone would come to pick the items up. “I am so thankful for our campus community’s effort in this coat drive,” said Baird. “It is heartwarming to know that everyone cares enough to help our neighbors in need.”

Top photo: David Baird with students Marisela Torres and Jordan Tupfer Cruz before delivering donations to InnVision/Shelter Network.

Pay for College With Scholarships

As someone who went back to college later in life, and as a parent who paid for the first child’s private education, and has another one currently in college, I understand the benefits of seeking out scholarship opportunities. It would have been a tremendous help to know that we were most likely eligible for something, even if it was small.

Once I started to work in education, I was shocked to learn how much money goes un-awarded because people just don’t apply. I also discovered that grant and scholarship aid for full-time students continues to increase. According to College Board, 53% of college tuition is paid for through scholarships and grants, but there is still a lot of money that goes un-awarded due to lack of applicants.

Here are some useful tips that I found while searching for scholarships.

  • Do not pay a fee for scholarship searches. If you work independently you can generally find more sources than using a paid service.
  • Resources like high school and college guidance counselors, web searches, information from the Department of Education and other sources are available to help you organize your search.
  • As you search you may notice that often grant or scholarship searches are focused on targeted groups like academics, talent, athletics, diversity, underrepresented groups (example: first generation students) and geographical locations.  If you string together words like scholarships, grants, college, university, adult, graduate student, major of interest, your ethnicity or groups you are involved with, this can also bring up random scholarships that are available.
  • Graduate, credential and adult (non-traditional) students should also do these searches. There are generally less funds available for these groups, but it can be worth the effort.
  • In exchange for use of a web site you might be asked to provide your email. People often create a secondary email from a free service if they are asked to provide their information, especially if they are concerned about the free search sites searching them out as well. That way you also have all of the sites and responses in one place.
  • Listed outside scholarships are additional to what a specific college might offer and do not include other grants or scholarships that a school’s financial aid office can determine your eligibility. Always remember to check with them as well.
  • Search local, you’d be surprised how many local scholarships are available, especially in the San Francisco Bay Area and Silicon Valley.

With the internet the search process has become much easier. There are many sites available to search from. In our free download, “Outside Scholarship Search Information For College Students,” we’ve included links to most of the key sites, as well as sites for diverse groups. Download it today and get started on your scholarship search!

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Public or Private College? Getting the best return on your investment.

As parents and students look at the rising costs of higher education, many have debated whether attending a private university in California is worth the expense. Here are some factors to consider:

Fact or Fiction?
Public Universities + Grants + Loans = Affordable Opportunities

Community colleges are seen as opportunities for immediate career placement, story or cost-saving measures for students with ambitions to transfer to a four-year institution. The total average cost of completing an AA degree in two years at a California community college was estimated to be $5,000. Students see this as an affordable opportunity to achieve a meaningful income.

For undergraduates considering the CSU or UC system, there is a wide-spread belief that they save on cost in the long-run versus a private education. Publicized access to grants and loans coupled with projected overall cost of attendance by the CSU and UC systems creates this expectation.

What are the financial risks of enrolling in a public institution?

Public colleges and universities are frequently targets for state cost cutting. California has seen a $1.5 billion cut to higher education between 2007-2008 and 2011-2012.

These cuts are significant and:

  1. Impact ability to offer merit scholarships to students
  2. Increase tuition rates on students, both in-state and out-of-state
  3. Reduce the size of faculty
  4. Create a shortage of class offerings year-round
  5. Generate large class sizes
  6. Result in longer delays to graduation

Students in public institutions are acquiring more risk and debt than anticipated.

Theoretically, students attending a community college should be able to complete their degree or transfer in as little as two to three years.

According to EdSource.org, only 52% of students in the California community college system seeking a degree, certificate or transfer, succeed after SIX years (spending an additional average $15,000 or more).

Some reports show completion rates taking as long as EIGHT years.

The National Center for Education Statistics shows an average matriculation rate for students starting at a four-year public institution is 72 months (six years) from first year of enrollment.

 

Private vs Public Grad Rates

© Independent California Colleges & Universities (AICCU), 2013

 

Aside from delays in graduation, students must work harder to be their own skilled advocate and find the external support they need to attain their degree goals. This includes ongoing access to information and advising on financial aid procedures and career mentoring. Transfer students also must keep up with changing admission standards for four-year colleges to acquire the necessary prerequisites to transfer (i.e. specific class units or an AA degree). This can sometimes be the biggest challenge. Many transfer students find that not all their coursework credits from their community college are equal to the coursework credits of the four-year public school counterpart. Private colleges have more flexibility on transferable coursework than the UC’s or CSU’s do.

Fact or Fiction?
Private Universities + Grants + Loans = Costly Opportunities

VIDEO: 9 Myths about Private Nonprofit Higher Education

Publicized access to grants and loans coupled with projected overall cost of attendance at private universities often creates “sticker shock”.  Although the initial shock gives the impression private education is too costly, it may be the more affordable option.

Oftentimes the published rates are rarely what students end up paying. According to the Council of Independent Colleges:

“Independent colleges and universities give students more than six times as much grant aid as does the federal government”.

Private universities are constantly working to find the best incentives for their students. They want to create lasting relationships. Whether you are a first-generation student, a top achiever or a high-need student, private universities invest time and resources to get to know you and to ensure that hard work outside the classroom is equally acknowledged when awarding scholarships.

Undergrads Receiving Financial Aid- Independent Colleges source

© The Council on Independent Colleges, 2013.

Discount Rates for Private UniversitiesThe key to getting the most for your money is to inquire with the private universities about scholarships, grants and discounts available to you.  Search outside scholarships.

Most private universities have the flexibility of offering an average tuition discount rate of 45% (sometimes more) to help offset the cost of your private education.

As a result, nearly one-third of bachelor’s students were able to graduate without any educational debt in 2012.

At the graduate level, the average student loan debt accrued is $22,380 – about $4,000 less than the national student debt level quoted by the Obama administration.

What are the risks with enrolling in a private institution?

Private universities may at times change their discount rates for various reasons, they do not however, run into the same issues that public institutions often face with state cost-cutting measures. Be sure to inquire with the Financial Aid Office for opportunities available to you.

Fewer years of paying tuition often means a quicker start at earning a salary.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the average graduation time for students in private universities is 50 months (4.2 years) from start to finish.

When calculating the true cost of college, it is important to consider the opportunity cost of delayed income in addition to the potential expense of an extra semester or year.

How private universities benefit the student:

  • Getting into classes = finishing sooner
  • Relevant majors + internships = great jobs
  • Small class sizes = personal attention
  • Guaranteed one-on-one advising = quality education

Consider if you graduated in four years instead of six, you could potentially be making $40,000/year, times two years, and be $80,000 ahead!

Note to Transfer Students:

Private universities each have their own transfer crediting methods. Some universities don’t require an AA degree completion to start classes, others may not allow you to retain all the credits earned at the community college level.

Check with an admissions counselor to ensure your classes are transferable. Click below to set up an appointment.

FREE Transfer Credit Evaluation

Accounting is hip and sexy these days!

Want a career where people are interested in what you have to say and offer? How about a job that is in demand while making good money? Do you want the flexibility to be self employed, work for a government organization or a large corporation?

Accounting is more than just crunching numbers these days and can actually be an interesting and lucrative career. Here are five popular career paths for accountants:

  1. International Accountant: Accounting isn’t all about office work. International accountants get to travel to faraway places and work with people all over the globe.
  2. Forensic Accountant: Forensic accountants go wherever the money takes them, investigating financial crimes and insurance fraud on behalf of companies and public law enforcement agencies.
  3. IRS Criminal Investigation Special Agent: Embezzlement, extortion and even murder are just a few of the crimes that IRS criminal investigation special agents uncover as a result of their scrutiny, according to the agency’s website.
  4. Comptrollers: Sometimes called controllers, they are in charge of an organization’s or governments purse strings, and closely watch all outgoing and incoming finances. Chief accountant is another way to describe the position. It’s a big responsibility to have, not to mention a pretty cool one as well.
  5. Chief Financial Officer: Forget about CEOs. As far as Wall Street is concerned, CFOs are the real kings of corporate America. CFOs are responsible for a company’s financial goals and budgets. In a publicly traded company, they are accountable for the organization’s financial reporting. The possibilities are endless!

Make sure you check out the Bachelor of Science in Accounting at Notre Dame de Namur University to help provide you with a strong foundation in business, highly valued by business employers. A major in accounting will allow you to meet the necessary academic requirements needed to take the professional Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination.

Nonprofits are big business. Qualified leaders are in high demand!

People in meetingThere has been a lot of discussion and research lately about the demand for organizational workers and leaders in the nonprofit sector. But, did you know that the nonprofit sector also grew faster — in terms of employees and wages — than both business and government combined?

Approximately 2.3 million nonprofit organizations currently operate in the United States, representing the third largest workforce of U.S. industry. In 2012 alone, public charities reported over $1.65 trillion in total revenues and $1.57 trillion in total expenses, accounting for 5.5% of the nation’s total GDP.

Figure 5: Anticipated Job Growth in Specific Areas by Year

Approximately one-third of nonprofits surveyed anticipate growth in the area of direct services (36%), program management/support (31%), and fundraising/development (31%) in 2013. As seen in figure 5, the percentage of organizations anticipating job growth increased from a year ago – and dramatically from two years ago – in all areas, with one exception, marketing/ communications/ public relations. Source: http://www.nonprofithr.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2013-Employment-Trends-Survey-Report.pdf

Figure 2: Plans to Create New Positions and Eliminate Positions and/or Gradually Reduce Staff in 2013 by Organization Type

This graph illustrates which fields anticipate the greatest increase in positions. Over half of health (62%), environment and animals (56%), education (53%), and faith-based (53%) organizations surveyed indicated that they plan to create new positions this year. In their projections to 2020, the Bureau of Labor Statistics findings support the increase in health care positions; they predict that employment in the health care and social assistance sectors will generate the largest number of jobs at an annual rate of 3%, which is the largest rate of all major employment sectors. Source: http://www.nonprofithr.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2013-Employment-Trends-Survey-Report.pdf

Exceptional leaders are in demand in the nonprofit sector.

According to Nonprofit HR Solutions, clients respond to the significant economic changes of the recent three to four years by maximizing efficiencies in infrastructure and operations and putting an even greater focus on the direct services work that influences resource development strategies. In this regard, all areas of nonprofit business that resonate with funders have greater opportunity to be highlighted and funded for further growth. That said, continued organizational growth and mission advancement requires a proportionate response in terms of infrastructure and operational support.

Job outlook by role.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, many of the roles Master’s of Public Administration (MPA) graduates pursue will see double-digit growth in employment between 2010 and 2020.

  • Human Resources Manager – 14%
  • Social Scientists and Related Workers – 18%
  • Urban and Regional Planners – 16%
  • Social and Community Service Managers – 27%
  • Medical and Health Services Manager – 22%
  • Public Relations Managers and Specialists – 21%
  • Management Analysts – 22%
  • Business and Financial Operations – 17%
  • Training and Development Managers – 15%
  • Operations Research Analysts – 15%

Learn how a Masters in Public Administration gets you the job.

According to the nonprofits that participated in the survey conducted by the Nonprofit Finance Fund, highly-trained organizational leaders are needed, now more than ever, in order to meet the growing demand for services and implement a wide range of goals: most importantly long-term financial sustainability.

This broad, yet flexible degree, allows you to instantly pursue many promising and well-paying job opportunities in a number of high demand and growth fields.

Fortunately there are programs to choose from to obtain an MPA, either with and online or an onground program through Notre Dame de Namur University (NDNU). A Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree from (NDNU) can help advance your career by preparing you for a wide variety of job opportunities across multiple industries, including government and private sectors.

Founded in 1851 by the Sisters of Notre Dame (originally from Namur, Belgium), Notre Dame de Namur University (NDNU) is an accredited Catholic, not-for-profit university in the San Francisco Bay Area in Silicon Valley. The University offers a welcoming, accessible learning environment anchored by dedicated professors who are committed to guide students both in their academic pursuits and career development.

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Opening Doors: Women in Science

“If we’re going to out-innovate and out-educate the rest of the world, we’ve got to open doors for everyone. We need all hands on deck, and that means clearing hurdles for women and girls as they navigate careers in science, technology, engineering, and math.”

First Lady Michelle Obama, September 26, 2011

Female student with professor in science labCollege degrees and jobs in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are all the rage right now. The jobs aren’t just exciting; they’re growing as well:

  • STEM grads have a lower unemployment rate than non-STEM grads (see She Geeks infographic)
  • The growth in STEM jobs in the past 10 years was three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs (see Edutopia infographic)
  • And that growth isn’t stopping: STEM jobs are projected to grow 17 percent from 2008-2018; non-STEM jobs are only projected to grow 9.8 percent
  • The payoff for STEM jobs is greater: STEM majors who go on to work in STEM jobs earn 20 percent more than non-STEM majors in non-STEM jobs (read report)

But another hot topic is gender inequality in the workplace, and the story is no different in STEM fields. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, while women make up almost half of the workforce in the United States, they have less than 25 percent of STEM jobs, despite the fact that more college-educated women have joined the workforce. However, women with STEM jobs earn 33 percent more than women in non-STEM jobs, and gap between compensation for men and women in STEM fields is less than in other areas.

With all the potential that is available to women in STEM, why aren’t there as many women pursuing STEM careers? In “Women in STEM: A Gender Gap To Innovation,” gender stereotyping and a lack of female role models are cited as a couple of the reasons for the discrepancy.

At Notre Dame de Namur University, there’s no shortage of female role models within our Department of Natural Sciences. We caught up with Natural Sciences faculty Melissa McAlexander, Ph.D., and Rachel Shellabarger, MS, to get their perspective on women in science.

Why did you pursue science?

MM: I was the kid who always loved science – it seemed like fun. My high school biology teacher had a particularly strong influence on me. She really encouraged me, and probably helped me understand for the first time that I could pursue science as a career.

RS: I think the case for myself and a lot of my colleagues was that we found topics we liked and stuck with them because we were passionate about them. As a more general trend, however, I think the scientific process is a way of thinking that works in all realms of life, and perhaps those of us that end up in scientific fields really appreciate that process.

Why is it important for women to work in science?

RS: It’s important for people to go into fields they are interested in and passionate about, regardless of their background/demographic. Science thrives on a range of diverse opinions, and we want the scientific field to be representative of our population as a whole. As with many other fields, there has been a history of excluding women (and other groups) from various parts of science, so we of course want to move toward a future where no group is excluded from a field because of demographics.

MM: In any field, having women as part of the team increases the diversity of ideas and experiences at the table. The process of science benefits when different perspectives are represented in the approaches we take. No gender or ethnicity (or any other way of classifying people) does science “better” than another. But the more we engage the whole of the population in science, the better science gets.

What advice would you give to a student who wants to pursue science?

RS: A career in science requires lots of hard work to understand course material, research protocols/findings, and the broader impact of science on society. Every individual’s background prepares them for scientific inquiry in different ways, and it’s important to understand the skills you bring with you, as well as the skills you need to work to improve.

MM: Go for it, if it is a fit with your interests, skills, and passion. You need to love the process of doing science, of gaining new understandings about the world, and/or of making something beneficial to society. There’s loads of fascinating questions being asked in laboratories in all fields these days – find an area you’re passionate for learning about, and dive in deep. Be ready to be challenged – to try something no one has ever done before, to learn new techniques, and to repeat something challenging until you perfect it.

Science: Where Can You Go and How Do You Get There?

When it comes to science-related job opportunities, the sky’s the limit. There are a number of jobs in clinical or research laboratories that do not necessarily require graduate degrees. Scientists in these positions are trying to answer many different questions that can have a direct impact on our lives. But not all scientists work in the lab — many companies are looking for knowledgeable employees to help with product development or provide technical customer service. These opportunities are available in a variety of fields, including molecular biology, biochemistry, health care and environmental science.

You may find working in science education may be more your speed. From university professor to grade school teacher to after-school science programs and museum education programs, there are many ways you can help pass on knowledge to the next generation of inquiring minds. Melissa McAlexander worked at The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose before coming to Notre Dame de Namur University. “It was a fabulous way of thinking about how to engage the public with science,” says McAlexander. “And man, was it fun!”

There are a number of scholarships available for women interested in studying science in college; here are a couple of web resources to get you started on your search:

Notre Dame de Namur University offers undergraduate degrees within the natural sciences — biochemistry, biology and kinesiology — as well as minors in biology, biochemistry, chemistry and environmental justice. A Bachelor of Science from NDNU will prepare you for the many exciting opportunities in science.

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Human Services: It’s not just about social work anymore.

There is a growing need for people in a variety of helping professions.

Students talking with professorIndividuals who recognize the importance of working with people, visit this serving them and meeting their needs are often drawn to human services to enhance their abilities to help others, take management roles in organizations or even start their own nonprofit. Although many jobs are in the nonprofit sector, generic often in well-paid positions, employee and human services positions in private and government organizations are also in demand.

Did you know that social and human services are among the most rapidly growing occupations?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job opportunities for social and human service employees are expected to grow much faster than average for all occupations, particularly for applicants with appropriate postsecondary education. The number of social and human service assistants is projected to grow by nearly 23% for all occupations between 2008 and 2018. Approximately 80,000 new jobs are expected to be created during the next decade. Many additional job opportunities will arise from the need to replace workers who advance into new positions, retire, or leave the workforce for other reasons. Employment in private agencies will grow as state and local governments continue to contract out services to the private sector in an effort to cut costs. Demand for social services will expand with the growing elderly population, who are more likely to need these services.

What can I do with a Human Services Degree?

The leadership skills developed makes Human Services graduates valuable contributors in non-profit organizations, government agencies, and corporations.

Examples include careers in:

  • counseling and social work
  • human resources or employee relations (profit and nonprofit)
  • health care
  • gerontology
  • community advocacy
  • law enforcement and other public safety fields
  • employee relations

These jobs include working with:

  • children and families
  • the elderly
  • people with disabilities
  • people with addictions
  • veterans
  • people with mental illnesses
  • immigrants
  • homeless and displaced people

What does a Human Services degree offer?

As one of the more versatile degrees, a Bachelor of Science in Human Services prepares you for work in a variety of fields and settings depending on your interests. Prerequisites for this degree generally require introductory knowledge of psychology and sociology.

Students often learn to develop skills in communication, advanced professional writing and how to apply and demonstrate problem-solving techniques to areas in Financial Management, Social Responsibility and Ethics.  At Notre Dame de Namur University, students often enhance their career goals by focusing on one of three specialized areas:

  • Administration
  • Counseling
  • Gerontology

A Bachelor’s of Science in Human Services can be a stepping-stone to a post graduate degree for professionals to advance their careers in management; many students continue their studies with a master’s in public administration, business administration, social services or psychology.

“Being in this program has truly changed my life as an individual, as a student, and as an employee. It has helped me gain better understanding of others in a realistic way and has inspired me even more to help and make a difference. The support of the advisers and teachers within the program makes an extreme difference. It is not easy to come back to school, but they are very supportive. They aren’t just there assisting in class, but are available to help at your convenience and sometimes where it is convenient for you. I can’t think of anywhere else in my education where I have had that much support and encouragement.” Read more student feedback.

Learn more about our accelerated evening Bachelor’s of Science in Human Services.

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Demand for Teachers is Increasing in California

If you want a career in teaching, now is the time!

The State of California is currently experiencing a teacher shortage in a variety of areas. With many teachers currently retiring or nearing retirement age, doctor the state needs 20, troche 000 new teachers a year. At the same time, the number of new teaching credentials granted annually in California is roughly 11,500, leading to a critical shortage and many opportunities. (Read more)

Teaching jobs are becoming available again

A recent report from the Learning Policy Institute showed that 75% of California school districts surveyed were experiencing teacher shortages. The vast majority of these districts reported that their shortfall was growing.

Chart

What subject areas are in highest demand?

In addition to the number of teachers needed, many school districts have a particularly strong demand for qualified teachers in mathematics, science, bilingual education and special education.

How do I get started?

Only a few universities in California now offer blended programs for undergraduates to complete a bachelor’s and a credential in as little as four years. Notre Dame de Namur University (NDNU) is one of the few colleges in California with this option, with a strong reputation for excellence in teacher education programs.

If you already have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in a credential, you can start a program as early as May 2017 to complete by fall 2018.

If you are just getting started, an accelerated blended Liberal Studies program offered through NDNU is designed for students to finish a BA and credential in as little as four years. Providing early fieldwork experiences in education, the program’s structured advising allows for successful job placement by graduation.

That saves an additional year or two of classes and gives first-year students an opportunity to gain fieldwork experience right away.

New single-subject credential program in biological sciences

NDNU is about to roll out a new four-year program that leads to a bachelor’s degree and a single-subject teaching credential for biology. The program, offered in conjunction with the San Mateo County Community College District, prepares students for classroom teaching in middle schools or high schools with four years of study. Students can complete the first two years of the curriculum either at NDNU or at a community college, allowing for significant time and cost savings over many other teaching credential programs. NDNU will begin accepting applications for the program in fall 2017, for fall 2018 admission.

Financial aid opportunities

There are special grants and financial aid available for students going into teaching. NDNU admissions and financial aid counselors can help you identify and apply for these funding opportunities.

Teaching as a second career

Many professionals are finding that after a career in business, the military or other sectors, they are looking for a work path that allows them to pass on knowledge and opportunities to the next generation. NDNU’s teaching credential programs are ideal for second-career teachers. Class start times are designed for working adults. The campus is centrally located for San Francisco-Silicon Valley workplaces and/or residences. Classes are small in size, and there is a strong collaborative spirit that supports returning students.

Extensive Alumni Network

Notre Dame de Namur has a long history in the field of teacher education. NDNU alumni work as administrators, principals and teachers throughout the Bay Area and California. This network provides a valuable resource for those seeking teaching jobs and student teacher placements.

Request Information on Notre Dame de Namur University Teaching Credential Programs

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There are special grants and financial aid available for students going into teaching, so make sure to explore these opportunities for assistance in paying for college.

Your First College Roommate

One of the most challenging things college students face is living with their first roommate. You’re moving in with someone you’ve never met before and you’re expected to get along for a whole year. How things turn out between you and your roommate is probably going to be one of those stories you tell when you go home. So, whatever your story, here are some tips about first roommates to make the transition a little easier.

Joscelyn Q. Pardo

“You never what?!!!”

The first month living with my freshman year roommate, we said that a lot. My roommate and I grew up on opposite sides of California (me from North, she from the South) and the cultural differences were a shock to us both. She didn’t know what an It’s-It was and I’d never been to a Ralph’s. We went to an ice cream social together and she’d never heard Mac Dre, E-40, or any of the other Bay Area artists whose songs were playing. She also didn’t understand my Northern California slang, like “hecka” or “hella.”

But living with her was not hard at all because, although we are different, we got along well. Rooming with someone you’ve never met before and who comes from a different background than you is a great opportunity to expand your knowledge about a world you never knew or thought about. My SoCal roommate taught me a lot about skin care routines, for instance.

“I’m not moving out, you are!”

I’ve seen it so many times, when two roommates don’t get along. The conflict could be that one stinks up the room with old In-N-Out Burger bags, or one basically has their girlfriend living with them. My advice for this is to talk to your roommate as soon as issues arise and then come to a compromise. Waiting until you’re completely fed up will end with unwanted drama and with your saying things you never wanted to say.

But if the issue can’t be resolved, and the dispute is big enough for the housing office to permit one person to move out, the process of separating as roommates will be less awkward and smooth if you’re both civil.

“Will you be one of my bridesmaids?”

Although you’re living with a stranger in the beginning, roommates can become close and turn into lifelong friends. Long nights staying up talking about the events of the day and sharing new experiences can quickly build a special bond. Your roommate can easily become the person you want to take to Coachella or ask to be your future bridesmaid. Don’t push away the idea of getting too close to your roommate. Even if you already have good friends when starting college, your roommate can be another. I actually recommend that you don’t live with your best friend from high school, and instead stay open to new friendships and experiences.

Joscelyn Q. Pardo is a student worker in Marketing and Communications at Notre Dame de Namur University and a sophomore majoring in psychology, and an RA in a residence hall.

For more information on applying to Notre Dame de Namur University (NDNU), please visit the admissions page.

 

The Charism of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur

Sister Roseanne Murphy SNDdeN

Whenever someone speaks about the “charism” of a religious community, it refers to the original intention of the congregation and the spirit behind its foundation. In the case of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, that original intention dates back to the stormy days of the early 19th century.

St. Julie Billiart began the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame in 1804 in Amiens, France, at a tumultuous time. It was the period at the end of the French Revolution. Thousands of men had been killed during the many attempts of other governments to rescue the French monarchy. Once Napoleon took over the government in 1799, the Napoleonic Wars were fought at nearly every border of the country. Those conflicts also took an enormous toll.

Thousands of women died of tuberculosis or starvation during the French Revolution, leaving many thousands of their children orphans. For ten years, schools led by religious men or religious women were closed. Those closings resulted in thousands of orphans and other children being deprived of the free schools staffed by members of religious orders.

During the Reign of Terror, the revolutionary government in France targeted clergy and the church and attempted to eliminate all traces of Christianity. St. Julie longed to help bring back the Catholic faith to France after ten years of persecution of its members. She wanted to reach out to poor children, many of whom were homeless, to teach them that God loved them and that they had dignity.

St. Julie’s message is carried on the cross worn by members of her congregation: “How Good is the Good God.” That message is the hallmark of her congregation. That simple phrase identifies her “charism.” It also motivates her members to bring the message of God’s love for His people to all those served by her sisters. She admonished her sisters, saying, “You cannot just talk about the love of God to the children, you much show them if they are to believe you.” It is a noble ideal and an awesome challenge to all the members of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur.

Sister Roseanne Murphy is a professor emerita of Notre Dame de Namur University and a member of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. The Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur founded NDNU.

For more information on applying to Notre Dame de Namur University (NDNU), please visit the admissions page.